Impact case studies

Oct 2015

 

A selection of case studies highlighting ESRC research impact in various areas of society. The views and statements expressed in the case study publications are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the Impact Initiative.

Impact helps to demonstrate that social science is important – that it is worth investing in and worth using.

Economic and societal impact is the demonstrable contribution that excellent social and economic research makes to society and the economy, of benefit to individuals, organisations and national and international communities.

Research impact embraces all the diverse ways that research-related skills benefit individuals, organisations and nations. These include:

  • fostering global economic performance, and specifically the economic competitiveness of the UK
  • increasing the effectiveness of public services and policy
  • enhancing quality of life, health and creative output.

The impact of social science research can be categorised as:

  • Instrumental: influencing the development of policy, practice or service provision, shaping legislation, altering behaviour
  • Conceptual: contributing to the understanding of policy issues, reframing debates
  • Capacity building: through technical and personal skill development.

 

For further information on maximising research impact take a look at the ESRC impact toolkit.

 

The Impact Initiative blog posts are either from individual researchers or from major research programmes. Some of the blog posts are original source and are written by researchers and experts connected to the two research programmes jointly funded by ESRC and DFID: the Joint Fund for Poverty Alleviation Research and the Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme. Other blog posts are imported from related websites and programmes. 

The views expressed in these blogs reflect the opinions of each individual and may not represent the Institute of Development Studies, the University of Cambridge, ESRC or DFID.

Comments:

The Impact Initiative welcomes comments.  To enable a healthy environment for discussion we reserve the rights to remove comments if they are considered abusive or disruptive. All comments are reactively moderated. This means that comments are usually only checked if a complaint is made about them.