Department for International Development/Pete Lewis
The world's poorest people lack capital and skills and toil for others in occupations that others shun. This project examines randomised evaluations of an innovative anti-poverty program which tackles capital and skills constraints at the same time in an effort to encourage occupational change among the world’s poorest women.
Workers in the Wool Tex Sweaters Limited in Shewrapara, Dhaka in Bangladesh
This study utilizes household survey data from four African and Asian countries to examine in depth, and on a comparable basis, the evolving nature of female labour supply in low income countries over the past two to three decades, and to analyse the links with poverty reduction.
The research delivers an in-depth understanding of the problems that teachers face supporting students from diverse backgrounds, the teaching practices they adopt, and the kinds of support they need to help all children fulfill their learning potential.

TB remains the single biggest killer of adults in the world - someone dies of TB every 15 seconds, nearly all in developing countries. TB particularly affects the poor. TB is a highly stigmatised disease - that is, TB patients are despised and shunned by the public. This adversely affects their lives, leading to isolation and depression, and limits their access to diagnosis and treatment. Up until now, the causes of this stigma and discrimination have not been properly studied.

Picture: mcandrea licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0
The research examines Amartya Sen's contention that shame is an attribute of poverty in all societies. Shame is believed to reduce a person's agency, the capacity to act constructively, and to increase social exclusion which, in turn, curtail economic development.
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