Department for International Development/Pete Lewis
The world's poorest people lack capital and skills and toil for others in occupations that others shun. This project examines randomised evaluations of an innovative anti-poverty program which tackles capital and skills constraints at the same time in an effort to encourage occupational change among the world’s poorest women.
 Flickr: Rita Willaert
The research responds to emerging global norms intended to reconcile natural resource management with poverty alleviation with potential to transform development practice, if they effectively support rights to natural resources and sustainable livelihoods.

Waste reuse and recycling has become increasingly important to livelihoods, particularly in the Global South. As environmental concerns and awareness of the financial benefits of waste rise, there is growing contestation over who will be allowed to benefit from waste.

Photo by Albert Gonzalez Farran - UNAMID
This research will inform understanding of the correlation that between the barriers of disability, and multidimensional poverty It must be recognised that in settings where everyone is poor, where few people access wage labour, where school attendance is paltry, healthcare access is limited and social protection is almost non-existent then disabled people are not necessarily very different from their neighbours.
Our ESRC/DFID funded research (RES-167-25-0557) suggested that shame associated with poverty is ubiquitous and structural being imposed by others in their dealings with people in poverty. Shame may serve to perpetuate poverty through eroding individual agency, while policies that stigmatise could be counterproductive in adding to the debilitating effects of shame.
A primary school classroom in Kampala. Uganda
An accurate way of measuring instructional practices and classroom processes is through observational methods. This project aims to develop an affordable, scalable, tool for assessing teacher practices and classroom processes, and assure its use in policy and practice in Uganda.
This pilot project provides English-language teaching for members of the deaf community in India including young people in high poverty contexts, and drafts a model of language-teaching interventions. It is an interdisciplinary collaboration including sign linguistics and technologists.
flickr.com/photos/carsten_tb/
The Literacy Laboratory Project (LLP) in Uganda aims to scale up and evaluate the Mango Tree literacy program, promoting reading and writing, especially in local languages, as a meaningful part of daily life in households and communities.

Despite infrastructure being the dominant expenditure category of most governments in the developing world (as well of multilateral and bilateral development organisations), we have a very limited understanding of whether and how infrastructure investments affect poverty and development. Two projects focused on India and East Africa will attempt to fill this key gap in our knowledge.

Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

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