Department for International Development/Pete Lewis
The world's poorest people lack capital and skills and toil for others in occupations that others shun. This project examines randomised evaluations of an innovative anti-poverty program which tackles capital and skills constraints at the same time in an effort to encourage occupational change among the world’s poorest women.
Photo ID 84614. 01/01/1989. Demra, Bangladesh. UN Photo/W. Wild. www.unmultimedia.org/photo/
Researchers measure the gender impact of poverty alleviation interventions in rural India and Bangladesh, including how impact has been mediated where cultural attitudes affect women's work and the affect of interventions.

This project seeks to understand the gender dynamics of the labour market in the context of Bangladesh. Labour markets are recognised as key institutional routes through which the benefits of growth are distributed across populations. Moreover, empirical research suggests that women’s access to labour market opportunities, particularly those which offer predictable incomes and ‘decent’ working conditions, can strengthen their voice and agency within the family and in the wider community.

Workers in the Wool Tex Sweaters Limited in Shewrapara, Dhaka in Bangladesh
This study utilizes household survey data from four African and Asian countries to examine in depth, and on a comparable basis, the evolving nature of female labour supply in low income countries over the past two to three decades, and to analyse the links with poverty reduction.
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