Informal m-health: How are young people using mobile phones to bridge healthcare gaps in Sub-Saharan Africa?

Drawing on qualitative and quantitative data collected in 2012–2014 from over 4500 young people (aged 8–25 y) in Ghana, Malawi and South Africa, this paper documents practices of using mobile phones to seek healthcare and the new therapeutic opportunities they create, alongside the constraints, contingencies and risks.

Intergenerational relations and the power of the cell phone: Perspectives on young people’s phone usage in sub-Saharan Africa

In this paper we reflect on the inter-generational encounters which are embedded in young people’s cell phone interactions, and consider the wider societal implications, not least the potential for associated shifts in the generational balance of power.

This project seeks to understand the gender dynamics of the labour market in the context of Bangladesh. Labour markets are recognised as key institutional routes through which the benefits of growth are distributed across populations. Moreover, empirical research suggests that women’s access to labour market opportunities, particularly those which offer predictable incomes and ‘decent’ working conditions, can strengthen their voice and agency within the family and in the wider community.

Young man with mobile phone in Ghana
Exploring how the rapid expansion of mobile phone usage is impacting on young lives and examines how policy makers can support the positive aspects of change, with studies conducted across Ghana, Malawi and South Africa.

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