Making a living and securing basic necessities in challenging environments. Including issues such as: social protection, climate change, resource scarcity, human capital, disabilities, resilience, and wellbeing.

Blog: Five tips for academics disrupted by digitisation

Mar 2017
The Digital Development Summit 2017 took place earlier this month. If trends that are disrupting millions of people’s working lives are set to continue, the global community can no longer continue with business as usual. Given the scale of the challenge ahead, and the unique impact that research can have on policy and practice, what does this mean for researchers? Here are five tips for international development researchers in an age of rapid digitisation.

New understanding of the ways in which higher education contributes to economic and human development has strengthened the justification for investment in higher education in lower-income contexts in recent years. This, in turn, has prompted a wave of reform and revitalisation efforts within African higher education systems.

image: flickr asiandevelopmentbank
This project monitors the effectiveness of the typhoon Yolanda relief efforts in the Philippines in relation to building sustainable routes out of poverty. The focus is on urban population risk, vulnerability to disasters, and resilience in the aftermath of these shocks and the conditions in which agency can be built over time.

Waste reuse and recycling has become increasingly important to livelihoods, particularly in the Global South. As environmental concerns and awareness of the financial benefits of waste rise, there is growing contestation over who will be allowed to benefit from waste.

Our ESRC/DFID funded research (RES-167-25-0557) suggested that shame associated with poverty is ubiquitous and structural being imposed by others in their dealings with people in poverty. Shame may serve to perpetuate poverty through eroding individual agency, while policies that stigmatise could be counterproductive in adding to the debilitating effects of shame.
Women barter at a market
A new set of initiatives, called graduation programmes, target poor households with asset transfers and income support for a fixed period. The objective is to graduate poor households out of poverty and support their resilience so they do not fall back into poverty.

Urban areas in sub-Saharan Africa are growing rapidly. While there has been considerable attention paid to the challenges of African mega-cities, the experiences of smaller urban areas have been relatively neglected. Secondary cities, with populations of less than half a million, are absorbing two-thirds of all urban population growth in Africa.

'Getting to Zero' extreme poverty involves ensuring that the policies, institutions and politics are right for the poorest people to escape poverty. As the reduction in the global number of people in poverty illustrates, there are widespread stories of success. We know much about how, and why, some households escape poverty and others do not.

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