Urbanisation in low-income nations presents both opportunities and immense challenges. As urban centres grow rapidly, inadequate housing and the lack of basic infrastructure and services affect a large and growing proportion of their population. There is also a growing body of evidence on urban poverty and its links with environmental hazards.

Principal Investigator: Katherine Ann Brickell. Lead Organisation: Royal Holloway, University of London

Co Investigators: Mark Sithirith (CARE Cambodia); Laurie Parsons (Independant Anti-Slavery Comissioner)

Photo: Arne Hoel / World Bank cash transfers programme
An increase in the number and scope of conditional cash transfer (CCT) programmes as a way to provide households with financial resources to meet subsistence needs while encouraging investment in children's human capital has come as a growing number live in extreme poverty after the recent financial crisis.

Domestic violence (DV) is a one of the starkest collective failures of the international community in the 21st century. Although a growing number of laws have been passed to protect women, governments from around the world have struggled to convert promises into prevention.

This timely study concentrates on the 2005 'Law on the Prevention of Domestic Violence and the Protection of the Victims' in Cambodia.

Investments to promote desired environment-development outcomes are some of the hardest to assess, because the causes of environmental resource scarcity are complex, and affect multiple aspects of human wellbeing, not just income. Credible evaluations of the impacts of these programmes on human wellbeing are few, offering little evidence to inform decision-makers about what works, for whom, and why. This project has three parts:

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