Fezeka High School, South Africa

Principal Investigator: Melanie Ehren (Free (VU) University of Amsterdam).

Lead Organisation: University College London (UCL)

Co-investigators: Andrew Neil Paterson Double-Hugh Marera (JET Education Service); Jacqueline-Aundree Jacqueline Baxter (Open University)

Researcher: Soong Moon Kang (UCL) 

School Children in Zomba, Malawi.

Principal Investigator: Elaine Sara Unterhalter. Lead Organisation: University College London (UCL).

Co-investigators: Relebohile Moletsane (University of KwaZulu-Natal); Rosie Peppin Vaughan (UCL); Catherine Marion Jere (University of East Anglia); Dorothy Cynthia Nampota (University of Malawi)

Researcher: Helen Ruth Longlands (UCL)

A high school in South Africa

South African higher education (HE) is characterised by inequalities of access, participation and success, and hence youth disadvantage, yet it is also seen as central to economic development and social mobility.

Primary school students in Alamana, Tanzania

Principal Investigator: Therese N. Hopfenbeck. Lead Organisation: University of Oxford

Co-investigators: Anjum Halai (Aga Khan University); Anil Kanjee (Tshwane University of Technology); Jo-Anne Baird (University of Oxford); Yusuf Sayed (University of Sussex); 

Vukani Primary School, Cape Town, South Africa.

The aim of the study is to understand resilience and exceptionalism in high-functioning township and rural primary schools in South Africa. Previous research has shown that a large part of the explanation behind these schools' success is the leadership and management practices of teachers and particularly principals.

Waste reuse and recycling has become increasingly important to livelihoods, particularly in the Global South. As environmental concerns and awareness of the financial benefits of waste rise, there is growing contestation over who will be allowed to benefit from waste.

Community management of handpumps has been the accepted mode of thinking for rural water supply over three decades in Africa. However, despite billions invested in rural handpumps one in three handpumps do not work in rural Africa. This represents a huge wasted investment and is associated with high but avoidable health, welfare and livelihood costs. Encouragingly, the risk of handpump breakdown bears all the hallmarks of an insurable risk.

This research seeks to answer the question: To what extent do education and peacebuilding interventions in the two countries promote teacher agency and capacity to build peace and reduce inequalities?

Can schemes like Avon be an important poverty reduction tool? This study, located in South Africa, assesses the sustainability of income Avon representatives earn, and explores the way this selling system affects communities to determine whether or not the scheme generates new wealth for impoverished communities.

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