Photograph of a midwife working in the Tanzanian health sector.
Focusing on the low or inadequate uptake of reproductive health services in sub-Saharan Africa, which directly influences the health and survival prospects of women and their children, as well as their economic participation and poverty.

This research project addresses the overarching research question: What factors shape pathways into and out of poverty and people's experience of these, and how can policy create sustained routes out of extreme poverty in ways that can be replicated and scaled up? 

Since the turn of the century low and middle income countries have introduced or expanded programmes providing direct transfers to families in poverty or extreme poverty as a means of strengthening their capacity to exit poverty.

Principal Investigator: Patrick James Nolen. Lead Organistion: University of Essex

Co-investigators: Isaac Osei-Akoto (University of Ghana) and Edoardo Masset (Institute of Development Studies)

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