Development in the 'raw': What livelihood trajectories and poverty outcomes tell us about welfare regimes and resilience in Afghanistan

Research Partners:

University of East Anglia
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This study examines livelihood trajectories and poverty outcomes among rural Afghan households, examining change from a 2002-2003 panel set of household data. It examines how households have formed their livelihoods and what evidence there is of resilience and agency and of constraints imposed by the institutional contexts in which the households function. The study will return to 15 of the original 21 study villages, spread across 5 of the original 7 provinces where the study of rural livelihoods was conducted in 2002-03. It will revisit a subset of the original study households within each of these villages, integrating cross-sectional, retrospective and prospective elements into a longitudinal panel research design. It will draw out guided narratives about everyday life experiences among male and female respondents from each household, focusing on major events experienced and hazards negotiated; current livelihood activities and outcomes; and how and why livelihood activities and outcomes have changed. It will use a multi-level research approach to link analysis of change at the micro level to changes within the meso and macro level contexts. This will illuminate the structural, historical and institutional factors affecting efforts to build secure livelihoods in rural Afghanistan, and how some families and individuals have more room to manoeuvre than others and what that means to poverty outcomes over time.

University of East Anglia
Paula Kantor
Adam Pain
Primary theme: 
Grant Reference: 
RES-167-25-0285
ES/F026080/1
Project Status: 
Closed
Grant Category: 
Research Grant
Lead Organisation Department: 
International Development
Fund Start Date: 
May 1st, 2008
Fund End Date: 
December 31st, 2010
Fund Currency Code: 
GBP
Fund Value: 
245940
Welfare
livelihoods
resilience
adaptation
informal
security
informal-security-regimes
rural-livelihoods
social-protection
social-inequality
dependant-relationships
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