Research for policy and practice

ESRC-DFID research for policy and practice: women and conflict

Photo (cropped): Making fishing nets as part of a co-operative. Photo credit: Russell Watkins/DFID/Flickr under license CC BY 2.0

Conflict affects women and men differently, and it can alter women’s economic and political roles in society. However, changes in women’s economic and political status and roles during times of conflict do not necessarily lead to long-lasting shifts. This collection of ESRC-DFID-funded research explores social norms, economic empowerment and women’s political participation in fragile and conflict-affected states, including Jordan, Pakistan and Somaliland.

Focus projects: 

Photograph of a woman in Hargeisa, Somaliland
Recent research recognises the importance of political settlements in determining the equitability of development and societal stability. This research on political settlements analyses the different roles that women and men play in determining a given settlement.
Contemporary political volatility within the Middle East region has led to far reaching socio-economic upheaval and strife with a devastating impact generating mass displacement of Iraqi, Palestinian, and Syrian refugees to Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey (UNCHR, 2014). In their host nations, these displaced communities seek to reconstruct their lives in a context of loss, poverty, violence and devastation (Kuttab, 2008; Chatty, 2010).
Domestic violence (DV) affects 30% of women worldwide and more than 50% of women living in conflict or post-conflict communities. The prevention of DV is important, not only because it is a violation of women's rights and freedoms, but also because DV negatively affects economic growth and perpetuates structural poverty.