Briefing paper

Raising learning outcomes in diverse Indian contexts

Photo: A classroom in India. Photo credit: Kirsten/Flickr licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

This policy brief shows that improving learning outcomes in diverse Indian contexts requires a rethinking of educational strategies. While improvements in physical access to schools are welcome, improving learning outcomes requires different stakeholders to strengthen their role and adapt teaching content and methods to local contexts. The paper highlights the key messages and policy implications from seven projects from the ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme. The research evidence provides valuable new insights to inform the Indian government’s efforts to ensure that all children benefit from quality education.

Focus projects: 

Principal Investigator: Nicola Ansell. Lead Organisation: Brunel University

Co-investigator: Peggy Froerer; Ian Rivers; Roy Huijsmans

Pupils attending deaf school in Sri Lanka
The research delivers an in-depth understanding of the problems that teachers face supporting students from diverse backgrounds, the teaching practices they adopt, and the kinds of support they need to help all children fulfill their learning potential.
Schoolchildren from Thamel, Kathmandu
Principal Investigator: Robin Shields. Lead Organisation: University of Bath
 
Co-investigators: Stephen Carney; Swati Banerjee; Hugh Lauder; Andres Sandoval Hernandez; Ganesh Bahadur Singh; P.K. Shajahan
 
The project will investigate how the accountability of schools differs according the school management model and whether accountability is linked to differences in learning outcomes.
Three young boys, some deaf, some hearing, in Kochi, India
The exclusion of deaf children and young adults from access to school systems results in individuals and communities being denied quality education, leading to unemployment, low income, and increasing poverty.
Indian children at school near Bodh Gaya
This project focuses on learning outcomes for 'disadvantaged learners' in India: children of primary school age who are disadvantaged by a range of structural inequalities, which are often cross-cutting, such as gender, location, caste, and class.