Making a living and securing basic necessities in challenging environments. Including issues such as: social protection, climate change, resource scarcity, human capital, disabilities, resilience, and wellbeing.

News: From period poverty to oil in Kenya – showcasing research at the Festival of Social Science
The Impact Initiative is excited to announce that it will be hosting two events as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science, 7-9 November 2018.

Engaging communities in rebuilding post-typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines

Communities are slowly being rebuilt after Super Typhoon Yolanda (also known as Typhoon Haiyan) struck the Visayas Islands in the Philippines in November 2013. Aid agencies, active on the ground in the immediate aftermath, have since left the region, leaving national and local government, policymakers and affected communities to respond to the long-term legacy.

Principal Investigator: Naila Kabeer. Lead Organistion: London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)

Co-investigator: Ashwini Deshpande (University of Delhi)

Amongst many development actors and public aid donors it is commonly perceived that the poor cannot escape poverty because they are credit constrained and as such cannot invest. The main reason why they are credit constrained being the lack of collaterals. Microcredit, the practice of lending small amounts of money to the poor, is heralded as a key tool in the fight against poverty in least developed countries (LDCs).

Since the turn of the century low and middle income countries have introduced or expanded programmes providing direct transfers to families in poverty or extreme poverty as a means of strengthening their capacity to exit poverty.

Picture shows a farmer and his wife with their store of maize crops - they have 7 children and 5 grandchildren. The maize is a drought tolerant variety.
This research seeks to generate robust, urgently needed evidence to address the critical knowledge gaps in order to inform policy debates and thinking on the further development of the Older Persons Cash Transfer Programme in Kenya.

Principal Investigator: Patrick James Nolen. Lead Organistion: University of Essex

Co-investigators: Isaac Osei-Akoto (University of Ghana) and Edoardo Masset (Institute of Development Studies)

Global poverty looks radically different in the 21st century as climate-related events, political-religious conflicts and economic growth-inequality nexuses add to persistent forms of social exclusion based on gender, race, and class.

The research responds to the unprecedented emergence of global environmental norms intended to reconcile natural resource management with poverty alleviation. Prominent examples of such norms are the social safeguards included in global conventions and the human rights-based rulings of international courts.

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